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Where Density, Square Meters, and Practicality Meet

Posted by RJ Tee on Aug 3, 2017 11:46:06 AM

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In this recent article on Data Center Knowledge, the author discusses the growing issue of data center real estate in Singapore and other APAC markets – or more accurately, the lack thereof.

While many countries, including portions of the United States and Northern Europe, benefit from large land masses, high-density city centers in most of the world place an absolute premium on every square meter of space.  In these areas, data center facilities are built more on the vertical axis, with support equipment stacked on roof tops and in basements.

This situation is analogous to the topography of the data center itself.

If you imagine the data center floor as a business and each hot and cold aisle its bustling streets, then each cabinet is its own version of the OCBC Centre in Singapore or the Petronas Towers in Kuala Lampur.  Space is at a premium, and the rent is steep for each server and storage device housed inside. 

So, wouldn’t you need to optimize the rack PDU in the same way?  Luckily, Server Technology has done just that.

To support high-equipment densities and the number of power cords that come with it, Server Technology has found a way to increase the number of C13 and C19 receptacles you pack into a tiny space by 20%.  Dubbed HDOT, or High Density Outlet Technology, our engineers have discovered a way to optimize the footprint of the PDU without giving up any ground.  

 

Here’s a great video that shows how it all comes together to maximize your real estate.  And it is available in bespoke configurations as well.  That’s ‘customized’ for those of you in the western hemisphere. 

Configure Your HDOT PDU

To learn more about how Server Technology can improve the density of your rack-based power distribution strategy,  click here.

Topics: HDOT, density