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Erik Stabile

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The Big Decision: Selecting Smart vs. Switched Data Center PDUs

Posted by Erik Stabile on Jan 11, 2018 10:40:00 AM

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Updated Jan 11, 2018, originally posted Jun 29, 2016 

Recently, many customers have inquired about whether they should implement smart or switched power distribution units (PDUs) into their data centers. After all, when looking at the two products side by side, they appear to be almost identical, as both products offer the following features:

  • Branch circuit protection
  • Input current monitoring
  • Environmental monitoring
  • Access, security and communications
  • An expansion module
  • Interoperability with Server Technology’s Sentry Power Manager (SPM)

There is one major difference, though, between smart and switched PDU: A switched PDU provides the ability to toggle power on and off on a per-outlet basis. As such, a switched PDU typically offers more control and flexibility on an outlet where it’s being used.

Conversely, a smart PDU will provide the same level of critical power and environmental data, but will not allow you to make changes to the outlet from a central location. Smart PDUs are more for monitoring and reporting purposes.

Here are some reasons a business would consider investing in a switched PDU:

Rebooting and power-up sequencing: When a core network device fails, it doesn’t always need to be taken in for service, or manually inspected. Sometimes, all it takes is a reboot to correct the underlying error. Reboots aren’t always easy, though, particularly for multisite data centers or colocation facilities. They can be time consuming and expensive, if they require sending technicians out to the actual data center to complete the task. Using a switched PDU, reboots can be performed remotely from a Web interface—thus potentially eliminating the need to deploy service technicians.

Switched PDUs also come in handy following power outages. In this case, operators need to be careful to avoid power surges when powering up equipment, as this can lead to additional network downtime. A switched PDU can enable staged power-up sequencing, allowing the network to ease back up to scale. 

“Locking out” unused outlets: Resources like space, power and cooling come at a premium price in medium-to-large data centers—especially in growing facilities. For this reason, it can be very challenging trying to deploy new IT equipment safely. Before a device can be installed into a cabinet, it’s vital to track the cabinet’s power usage and environmental conditions over time. Otherwise, installing the device could prove to be dangerous.

Suffice to say, in a medium-to-large environment it can be very difficult trying to keep a running historical account of each cabinet’s usage history and available capacity. With the help of a switched PDU, though, managers can easily identify outlets which are not safe for use based on aggregated historical data. Then, the outlet can be toggled off so that no equipment can be added to it. 

Scheduling power loads: Many data centers waste power by continuing to run equipment during off-hours when the network is not being fully used, usually because it is more cost-effective to keep the equipment running and saves time over having to manually reboot. A switched PDU allows operators to strategically schedule each outlet to avoid wasting power. As we explained in a recent white paper, one government agency was actually able to reduce power usage in their POC data center by an average of 50 percent for any given week using a switched PDU. It should also be noted that switched PDUs are ideal for identifying and eliminating “zombie” servers, or comatose servers that use large volumes of data over time by running idly.

The aforementioned points are just some of the benefits to using a switched PDU, and the white paper contains many more.

Keep in mind, though, that determining the right type of PDU can be very complex.  (We can help you decide which PDU is best for your application within our rack pdu buying guide) And in some cases, a switched PDU may not be the best choice to fit your needs. For example, if you are managing a single facility, there may be little need to use remote management technologies; your staff members may prefer to perform outlet changes manually. The scope of your operation, your risk factor for downtime, your budgetary allowance and your staff members’ preferences should all be considered when deciding what type of PDU to use.  

Server Technology can outfit your business with smart or switched PDUs—and both can be equipped with Per Outlet Power Sensing (POPS) technology capable of reporting voltage, kW power, current, crest factor and power factor. Server Technology also offers metered and basic PDUs. With all of the options to choose from, it's easy to become overwhelmed when deciding which PDU is right for your data center. With this in mind, we've created a handy rack PDU selection wizard and flow chart that addresses all levels of power needs, as well as describes each of the PDU features.

Click to try our PDU selection wizard

Topics: switched PDUs, data center power, smart pdus

The Big Decision: Smart vs. Switched Data Center PDUs

Posted by Erik Stabile on Dec 28, 2016 4:37:24 PM

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Recently, many customers have inquired about whether they should implement smart or switched power distribution units (PDUs) into their data centers. After all, when looking at the two products side by side, they appear to be almost identical, as both products offer the following features:

  • Branch circuit protection
  • Input current monitoring
  • Environmental monitoring
  • Access, security and communications
  • An expansion module
  • Interoperability with Server Technology’s Sentry Power Manager (SPM)

There is one major difference, though, between smart and switched PDU: A switched PDU provides the ability to toggle power on and off on a per-outlet basis. As such, a switched PDU typically offers more control and flexibility on an outlet where it’s being used.

Conversely, a smart PDU will provide the same level of critical power and environmental data, but will not allow you to make changes to the outlet from a central location. Smart PDUs are more for monitoring and reporting purposes.

Here are some reasons a business would consider investing in a switched PDU:

Rebooting and power-up sequencing: When a core network device fails, it doesn’t always need to be taken in for service, or manually inspected. Sometimes, all it takes is a reboot to correct the underlying error. Reboots aren’t always easy, though, particularly for multisite data centers or colocation facilities. They can be time consuming and expensive, if they require sending technicians out to the actual data center to complete the task. Using a switched PDU, reboots can be performed remotely from a Web interface—thus potentially eliminating the need to deploy service technicians.

Switched PDUs also come in handy following power outages. In this case, operators need to be careful to avoid power surges when powering up equipment, as this can lead to additional network downtime. A switched PDU can enable staged power-up sequencing, allowing the network to ease back up to scale. 

“Locking out” unused outlets: Resources like space, power and cooling come at a premium price in medium-to-large data centers—especially in growing facilities. For this reason, it can be very challenging trying to deploy new IT equipment safely. Before a device can be installed into a cabinet, it’s vital to track the cabinet’s power usage and environmental conditions over time. Otherwise, installing the device could prove to be dangerous.

Suffice to say, in a medium-to-large environment it can be very difficult trying to keep a running historical account of each cabinet’s usage history and available capacity. With the help of a switched PDU, though, managers can easily identify outlets which are not safe for use based on aggregated historical data. Then, the outlet can be toggled off so that no equipment can be added to it. 

Scheduling power loads: Many data centers waste power by continuing to run equipment during off-hours when the network is not being fully used, usually because it is more cost-effective to keep the equipment running and saves time over having to manually reboot. A switched PDU allows operators to strategically schedule each outlet to avoid wasting power. As we explained in this white paper, one government agency was actually able to reduce power usage in their POC data center by an average of 50 percent for any given week using a switched PDU. It should also be noted that switched PDUs are ideal for identifying and eliminating “zombie” servers, or comatose servers that use large volumes of data over time by running idly.

The aforementioned points are just some of the benefits to using a switched PDU, and the white paper contains many more.

Keep in mind, though, that determining the right type of PDU can be very complex. And in some cases, a switched PDU may not be the best choice to fit your needs. For example, if you are managing a single facility, there may be little need to use remote management technologies; your staff members may prefer to perform outlet changes manually. The scope of your operation, your risk factor for downtime, your budgetary allowance and your staff members’ preferences should all be considered when deciding what type of PDU to use.  

Server Technology can outfit your business with smart or switched PDUs—and both can be equipped with Per Outlet Power Sensing (POPS) technology capable of reporting voltage, kW power, current, crest factor and power factor. Server Technology also offers metered and basic PDUs. To see a side-by-side comparison of all of Server Technology’s PDUs, click here.

Topics: switched PDUs, data center power, smart pdus

What Thermal Exhaust Ports Have You Overlooked in Your Data Center?

Posted by Erik Stabile on Dec 21, 2016 2:34:45 PM

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Look at you, skulking around your data center like Lord Vader at home in his Death Star. Sure, you don’t have any plans to destroy any competitors’ offices or nearby planets with your superlaser any time soon, but you’re pretty confident that, if given the opportunity, you could.

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In the mean time, you can rest easy in your ergonomic office chair knowing that your department—and job—are safe and secure. Right?

Well, this is exactly what Darth Vader did. And it didn’t work out too well for him.

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What Vader failed to realize is that his chief architect made a critical error that would ultimately lead to his demise. By overlooking the Death Star’s thermal exhaust ports, he left the space station wide open to Luke’s attack, which ultimately led to its destruction.

Should we cut the kid some slack? It’s tough to say. On one hand, the Death Star was the size of the Moon. So it’s easy to see why he did so, as he needed to expel the pent up exhaust generated by the immense station. On the other hand, there was another main exhaust port, so it may not have been entirely necessary. What we’d really love to see is a tape of the minutes from the Empire’s executive Death Star planning committee meeting. We could only hope for this to emerge someday. Hint hint, George.

In either case, there’s a valuable lesson to be learned here: You may be overlooking some critical design flaws related to energy efficiency which could come back to bite you if you don’t discover and fix them. After all, on most days, your data center consumes close to the same amount of energy the Death Star used. And while you may not have any X-wings in your neighborhood, you do have the Force-wielding C-suite to be aware of who are just itching for an excuse to outsource your department to an offsite managed services provider. So you need to ensure your data center infrastructure is highly efficient, and not hemorrhaging power and money.

By implementing power monitoring PDUs, utilizing virtualization and containers, automating data center management systems—among other architectural considerations that you can find by clicking here—you can ensure that your data center stays safe and secure.

 

Topics: data center uptime

Use Top Shelf PDUs for your Colocation

Posted by Erik Stabile on Dec 19, 2016 8:43:08 AM

BeautyGroupColor_small.jpgIf there’s one need you can’t skirt around as a colocation provider, it’s rack-level power management.

Power is expensive, and there is too much at stake in your mission critical environment to go without a reliable network of intelligent power distribution units (PDUs)  that can track daily usage, prevent outages and respond to environmental alerts.

Here at Server Technology, we offer best-in-class power distribution units (PDU) that are ideal for use in large colocation centers. Here are some reasons why you should consider Server Technology for your rack-level power management needs:

Fast shipment times: Oftentimes, vendors will make customers wait several weeks to receive products, which is far too long. With Server Technology, you will always be guaranteed fast shipment times. We store our products in our own warehouse, which saves a great deal of time. We are able to ship our Fast Movers in just a few days.

Get more, pay less: Our HDOT PDUs offer more outlets per form factor than anything else on the market. Buying one HDOT PDU from Server Technology is like buying two or more standard PDUs, and more power density means more white space for future data center growth. Choose a PDU with Alternating phase outlets, which alternate the phased power on a per-outlet basis instead of a per-branch basis. This allows for shorter cords, quicker installation and easier load balancing for 3-phase rackmount PDUs. Shorter cords mean less mass, making them less likely to come unplugged during transport of the assembled rack.  Learn more about density solutions.

Custom design: Why settle for one-size-fits all solution, when you can use our Build Your Own PDU portal? We make it possible to choose your type of PDU (metered or smart or switched, smart POPS or switched POPS), and then add specific power, plug and color options.

Best value: Our new High Density Outlet Technology Switched PDU with Per Outlet Pops Sensing (POPS) technology solves three challenges in one:  Power density, capacity planning and remote management.

Server Technology is your go-to provider for all of your PDU needs. You’ll be hard-pressed to find a vendor that offers as high a level of quality, and support.

To get started, click here.  

Topics: data center power, colocation

Innovative Power Solutions for Government Clients: Part 1

Posted by Erik Stabile on Dec 7, 2016 10:51:19 AM

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Helping the federal government operate more efficiently may sound like a Herculean task, but it’s one the Power Strategy Experts at Server Technology are well prepared to take on. With years of experience working with the federal government, we proudly help the U.S. Air Force, U.S. Coast Guard, NASA, the Army, Navy and others with their data center power needs.   

There are some unique needs and initiatives driving change in the Federal data center space. We’ll explore some of those in this, the first of a two-part series.  

Data Center Evolution: The Path to High Efficiency 

Charles Darwin is quoted as saying “It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change”. Technology presents real changes in our lives and as it continues to advance, so must our actions and behaviors.  The ability to handle rising rack densities and scale while improving efficiencies in the data center is more critical than ever.  As a result, the Federal Government continues to improve and optimize their approach to continual evolution. Part of their improvements lie in the Data Center Optimization initiative (DCOI), designed to improve efficiency, lower operation costs and enhance overall optimization. Building off of the success of the 2010 Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative (FDCCI), DCOI looks to continue consolidation efforts by requiring existing data centers to operate at apower usage effectiveness/PUEbelow 1.5 or face closure by September 30, 2018. For Nevada-based Server Technology, “These requirements will call for critical data center infrastructure improvements, says Federal Sales Manager Jason Mollicone. As a result, Mollicone says, “This creates a lot of opportunity for us to address real customer challenges,” he says. In order to reduce PUE and increase efficiency, monitoring and reporting of data must be implemented. Our solutions allow the customer to monitor, collect and report on the data needed in order to be efficient and successful towards DCOI goals. 

“Today, the federal government is putting more enforcement in place to optimize and improve facilities to ensure that funding and energy are being used effectively,” he says.  

Each initiative instituted by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) includes data center consolidation and server room optimization, which will help the government operate its data centers more efficiently and effectively. “We’re helping customers put real metrics in place to say, ‘OK, here’s what’s going on in our data center, and here is how we can make the necessary improvements to improve efficiency’” Mollicone says. “We want to put accurate data behind everything and take out the guess work so the customer can be in the best position possible.” This data can be used to make decisions, such as determining which facilities are not efficient enough to remain operational. Other times, it means making adjustments and upgrading facilities to make them run more efficiently and save taxpayer dollars, Mollicone says.  

“It’s about creating a more efficient environment that helps lower costs, save energy and optimize data center infrastructure,” Mollicone says. “Server Technology’s solutions are great because they allow the customer do that at the rack level, which is a key component in operating and maintaining an efficient environment.” 

Next, in part two, we’ll explore some of the solutions Server Technology has developed to serve our federal clients.  

Topics: data center power, government consolidation, server technology solutions

Five Key Benefits of HDOT Switched POPS PDUs

Posted by Erik Stabile on Dec 6, 2016 10:06:39 AM

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Not that long ago, we told you about our customer-focused approach to design and production. We showed how our products often result from working closely with customers to determine their power distribution needs. Now, we’re excited to roll out the newest evolution in customer-driven design: the HDOT Switched POPS PDU 

With this HDOT® Switched POPS® (Per Outlet Power Sensing) unit, we’ve unleashed one of the most powerful additions you can make to your data center floor, giving you complete control and the peace of mind that comes with it.   

Click Here To Build Your Own HDOT PDU  with Alt-Phase and POPS

Here are the top five reasons to consider HDOT Switched POPS:  

  1. All the right outlets in all the right places: featuring a slimmer form factor and stacked outlets, our HDOT (High Density Outlet Technology) PDUs are designed with maximum density in mind. With HDOT technology, we’re able to fit as many as 43 C13s in a 42U high network managed PDU device, which is more than 20 percent smaller than PDUs employing standard outlets.  
  2. High native cable retention: Our PDUs feature high cable retention to reduce accidental disconnects by making sure power cords are solidly connected to devices. Our PDUs are tested for up to 12 pounds pull strength, eliminating the need to purchase ancillary locking cord devices.  
  3. Easy load balancing with alternating phase: With HDOT technology, you’re not only getting the highest outlet density available in a network-connected rack PDU, you’re also getting three-phase powered wired in an alternating fashion per outlet. This helps simplify load balancing, reduces cord lengths and stimulates better airflow.  
  4. Build it yourself: With Server Technology’s Build Your Own PDU tool, you can select the number and arrangement of outlets that best suits your data center power needs. Our new four-step configuration process graphically walks you through customization options such as voltage, amperage, phase, plug type, input cord orientation, outlet configuration, connectivity and color selection. 
  5. Options galore: HDOT PDUs are available in smart, switched and POPS. With the addition of the switched line, you’re able to remotely turn outlets on, off or reboot them – either individually or as a group. See our complete line here 

With POPS onboard, our PDUs provide +/- 1 percent billable-grade accuracy for energy consumption at each outlet for typical data center equipment loads. The POPS technology also includes warnings and alarms for current, power and power factor, both for low and high values.  

Learn more about HDOT Siwtched POPS PDUs here 

Topics: data center power, Per Outlet Power Sensing, HDOT Switched POPS

Problem? Not A Problem With HDOT Switched PDUs.

Posted by Erik Stabile on Dec 1, 2016 10:00:00 AM

If a solution doesn’t exist for your problem, we’ll innovate one, simple as that. Case in point: our High Density Outlet Technology (HDOT) PDUs didn’t exist until a client came to us looking for an innovative solution to a unique challenge.

Travis Irons, Server Technology Director of Engineering, recalls the moment the idea for HDOT came to him.

“About four years ago, one of our larger clients came to us with a quote for 40 to 50 different configurations of products,” Irons says. “Many of them were high density, with many outlets for the volume. With the conventional, off-the-shelf outlets everyone was using then, we couldn’t make it fit at first.”

The answer, Irons says, was sitting right on his desk. It was a prototype of an outlet he was using to find a cord locking solution. He realized the cord locking aspect wouldn’t help Server Technology’s client, but its high-density design was just what they needed.

“I realized this thing that had been staring at me from my desk for months was the answer,” Irons says.

By stacking the outlets and slimming down the form factor, the HDOT was born. Today, it’s one of our top sellers, and it has begun racking up awards, too.

By offering a 20 to 30 percent reduction in footprint, the HDOT PDU allows data center customers to put more servers into their racks, saving on increasingly valuable real estate costs. Using alternating phase power, HDOT creates a more efficient flow than those running one- or two-phase power. It also simplifies load balancing and cable management by creating shorter cable runs.

Check out the top 10 reasons to try our HDOT Switched units.

HDOT is available in Switched and Smart POPs to offer an extra level of monitoring for data center managers who are looking to track trends across the center floor. With HDOT in place, you can better understand and improve your power usage habits in a very short time. Another bonus: HDOT helps you spot zombie servers that consume power without providing any benefit.

In the end, Irons says the ability to innovate on the fly is a major differentiator for Server Technology.

“We can offer out of the box solutions and different technologies that just aren’t feasible for our competitors to design,” he says. “We have a small company mentality with a startup attitude and that, I think, gives us an edge.”

Click Here To Build Your Own HDOT PDU  with Alt-Phase and POPS

Topics: HDOT, data center power density, Switched

Using a consumer power strip in your server rack? It's time to upgrade.

Posted by Erik Stabile on Nov 29, 2016 9:09:21 AM

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Recently, a customer wondered about the real difference between high-quality power distribution units (PDUs) for the data center, and standard 120V power outlets (like the kind you would find in Home Depot). Why spend the extra money? They both supply power directly to the cabinet, right?

In short, yes—they do. The products, however, are in different classes in terms of what they are capable of providing. Think of it this way: A power outlet is to a power distribution unit like a flip phone is to a smart phone; the former is very basic, while the latter is much more powerful and complex. 

A standard power outlet, in other words, offers 120V of alternating current (AC), seven outlets and, in some cases, surge protection. Conversely, Server Technology’s most basic rack PDU offers up to 230V AC and up to 26 outlets in a slimmer, more compact device that is specifically engineered for use in a high-performance data center. On the other end of the spectrum, Server Technology’s advanced PDUs can provide up to 42 outlets in a single unit, with up to 415V AC, advanced network cards, power measurement technology, temp and humidity probes, and the list goes on...

It’s important to note that Server Technology has several different—and highly customizable—products in its PDU family. In addition to the aforementioned basic PDU, there are also metered, smart, switched, smart POPS (Per Outlet Power Sensing) and switched POPS PDUs.

Here is a look at some of the advanced capabilities of Server Technology’s PDUs:

Remote switching (for switched PDUs and switched POPS): To toggle power on and off with a standard PDU, you need to be standing right next to it. Server Technology’s PDUs enable individual outlet control for remotely switching power on and off. This feature is ideal for large data centers that have hundreds of different cabinets, or those with multiple facilities spread out across the world. Authorized users can use remote switching to control power flows without having to be physically present.

Input current monitoring (for metered, smart, switched, smart POPS and switched POPS): The vast majority of power usage in a data center comes from cabinets, where servers run all day and all night, week in and week out. Many servers, for that matter, run even when they are not being used, which wastes electricity and money. When using basic power outlets, there is no way to tell how much electricity is being used in each cabinet on a daily basis.  Server Technology’s input current monitoring feature allows managers to see power usage for individual circuits, which is helpful for identifying which devices can be scaled back or eliminated to reduce waste.   

Secure access (for smart, switched, smart POPS and switched POPS): With the ability to monitor input current comes the great responsibility to protect this information from hackers or unauthorized users. Server Technology’s PDUs come with strong access, security and communications controls so that only authorized users can access power usage data and make critical changes to the network.

Greater cable retention (for all PDUs): In a standard power outlet, cables can easily become dislodged, which can lead to unexpected power outages. Server Technology offers PDUs that come with lockable, high-retention outlets to ensure that cables stay firmly in place.

Environmental monitoring (for smart, switched, smart POPS and switched POPS): A standard power outlet won’t do much to prevent environmental disasters. That’s because power outlets don’t contain advanced sensors for measuring temperature and humidity levels. Server Technology’s PDUs do contain such sensors, which can transmit critical environmental alerts when cabinets exceed customizable environmental thresholds. This allows managers to prevent equipment from overheating and breaking. What’s more, all of Server Technology PDUs are designed for use in higher temperatures, which means they come with less inherent risk.   

Alternating phase distribution (for 3-phase PDUs): Load balancing is a necessary—also difficult and time-consuming—task that must be performed manually on standard power outlets. Server Technology’s PDUs streamline load balancing with a new, unique method called alternating phase power distribution. The result is a simpler and more efficient process.

Flexible mounting (for all PDUs): Standard power outlets rest on the floor, where they get kicked around and abused. Server Technology’s PDUs are slim and flexible enough to mount directly inside or on top of a cabinet, where they take up less room.

These are just some examples of how Server Technology’s high-quality PDUs differ from standard outlets. For more information, click here

Topics: powerstrip

The Right PDU For Your Data Center Power Needs

Posted by Erik Stabile on Nov 21, 2016 3:13:56 PM

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Editor's Note: Originally Posted November 21, 2016.  Updated August 16, 2017

visit the updated rack PDU buying guide here: http://www.servertech.com/rack-pdu-buying-guide

At Server Technology, we understand that power needs vary from customer to customer. Some data centers require all-in-one power solutions complete with all the available bells and whistles, while others have more basic needs. But one thing that doesn’t vary is the desire for a best-in-class high quality power product. Another thing that’s for certain is that Server Technology’s award-winning power solutions provide just that.

Sales Engineer Amanda Senger says Server Technology’s large selection of PDUs is a major differentiator among its competitors.

“We’re really good at one thing: PDUs,” Senger says. “We have over 2,000 different part numbers, where our competitors only have 100-200, so we have a lot more flexibility we can offer our customers.”

With so many options to choose from, it’s easy to become overwhelmed when deciding which power solution is right for your data center. With this in mind, we’ve created a handy PDU selection flow chart that addresses all levels of power needs – from basic, non-metered PDUs to Switched POPS with outlet-level power monitoring.

It’s helpful to first understand that Server Technology offers four main families of PDUs, each offering a unique set of capabilities: Basic, Metered, Smart and Switched. To determine which is best for your data center ask the following questions:

  1. Do you need current displays? If not, then one of our Basic PDUs with power in and power out is probably sufficient for your needs. If you do need current displays with local LEDs on the PDU, you should consider a product from our Metered family.
  1. Do you need network monitoring? If you need an LED but don’t want networking capabilities, many products within the Metered family will do the trick. If, however, you want network monitoring, our Smart family of PDUs is a good bet. These are well suited for companies performing remote monitoring as well as those with thousands of strips on the data center floor. 
  1. What about individual outlet control? This is a big factor for remote users, allowing them to remotely turn the PDU on and off without having to go on site to unplug and plug back in individual power strips. If you seek individual outlet control but don’t need outlet-level power monitoring, you can stick with any of our Smart PDUs, but if you want to monitor each outlet, then the Smart POPS (Per Outlet Power Sensing) PDUs are right up your alley. These units provide very detailed information, letting you know what’s wrong – or what’s about to go wrong.
  1. For those who want current displays, network monitoring, individual outlet control but not outlet-level power monitoring, the Server Technology Switched family is also worth a look. If, however, you need all of the above, plus outlet-level power monitoring, the All-In-One Switched POPs PDU is probably right for your data center. POPS units are perfect for customers who don’t yet understand how much power they’re using, and can work in any size data center.

Ultimately, Senger says, there’s a solution for everyone with Server Technology’s PDU lineup.

“Whether your needs are basic or complex, we offer a solution for you,” she says. “Even if you don’t need power monitoring, you’re probably still going to want a high outlet count in a high-quality PDU.” 

Want to learn more about our families of PDUs? Visit our Products page or get in touch with your Power Strategy Experts to get started today.

click to view the Servertech rack PDU buying guide

Topics: data center power, data center rack power

Data Center Power Management, From The Bottom Up

Posted by Erik Stabile on Nov 17, 2016 9:47:38 AM

datacenter.jpgFashions and tech trends come and go, but some things in life remain constant. For data center managers, those constants include the challenges of understanding growth through density awareness, capacity planning and uptime maintenance, among others. Also constant is the need for outlet switching and outlet-level power measurements in order to hit goals related to complete device management, growth and efficiency.

In our recent whitepaper, “Bottom-Up Data Center Power Management,” we detail one of the main ways to achieve these goals: the use of rack PDUs with outlet switching and outlet-level power measurement capabilities.

 The paper delves into the following topics:

  • Managing IT Devices: IT devices housed in the data center must be managed not only for what they’re doing during operation, but also for their lifecycle from deployment through retirement and everything in between.
  • Lock-out and Deployment: The three big questions of “where” relate to power, cooling and space required to support new devices in the data center. We’ll show you why the method of installing equipment simply where it fits isn’t an optimal approach, and why the locking out of outlets is a better way to go.
  • Tracking: More easily manage deployments by configuring the basic characteristics of each piece of equipment.
  • Managing Growth: Why it’s no longer valid to only think about growth in terms of the overall data center size or total number of data centers.
  • Density: Learn about the extent to which the particular equipment in each rack plays a major role in the overall density of power usage in the data center.
  • Capacity Planning: See how to set a threshold limit for capacity to allow for an alert, which results in an actual prediction for when a cabinet will run out of power or exceed a temperature threshold.
  • Managing Efficiency: Learn about maintaining the balance between “going green” and “saving some green” in your wallet.

Pick up these practical tips and more in the whitepaper, “Bottom-Up Data Center Power Management” today.

Topics: data center power

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